Keeping Pets Safe in the Home and Yard

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Pets are part of our families so we should be sure they stay safe whether in the home or yard!

Bathrooms and Laundry Rooms – Toilet bowls are filled with water and often tempt pets to drink from them. This can cause a pet to drown, or it may poison them if toilet bowl cleaners are inside. Medications, both prescription and otherwise, are often kept in a bathroom, as are things such as bathroom cleaners, chemical drain openers, and deodorizers. Sharp items such as razors are also kept in bathrooms and can cut and seriously injure a pet that plays with or swallows them.

Laundry Room – Laundry rooms are also a place where chemicals such as bleach and detergent are stored and regularly used. Fabric softener sheets may seem harmless; however, they are filled with chemicals. Open dryers are tempting to pets that may climb inside to sleep, stay warm, or hide. This can be dangerous if the door is accidentally shut and the machine turned on.

Living Rooms – Unstable or top-heavy furniture can fall if jumped on or if bumped hard by a playful animal. Many types of potted house plants are known to be toxic if chewed or swallowed. The cords to drapery and window blinds are a choking hazard if they accidental loop around a pet’s neck, while electrical cords, if chewed on, can shock or electrocute a pet or start a fire.

Kitchens – Kitchens are an overall dangerous place for pets to be. Jumping pets have access to countertops and tables, while all animals can easily get to anything that’s within their reach, such as kitchen trash cans or food on the table. When it comes to threats, food is the most obvious culprit, as certain items, such as chocolate and raisins, are toxic while others represent a choking hazard.

Bedrooms – Although the bedroom may seem like an overall safe place for pets, it is the unexpected, little things that can prove problematic for pets. Electrical cords are dangerous to pets that are chewers, and small items such as earrings and hair pins may also be chewed or swallowed. Discarded shopping bags are a suffocation risk if a pet sticks its head inside and is unable to shake it off. Moth balls in closets or drawers are toxic, as are certain house plants that may be kept in the room.

Garages and Basements – Because these are areas outside of the main house and protected from the elements outdoors, they are places where deadly chemicals and other potentially lethal items are stored.

Toxic items that are commonly stored in garages and even basements include antifreeze, which is sweet-tasting but can cause a cat or a dog’s kidneys to fail if consumed. Motor oil, gas, battery acid, and car wax are just a few other dangerous car-related items. Additionally, pesticides, rat poison, paint, and paint thinners are examples of items kept in either location that can be lethal to a pet.

Yard – Certain items that are used on the lawn, flowers, and plants, such as fertilizers, pesticides, mulch, and compost, may contain chemicals or elements that a pet should not eat, drink, or lick. Cocoa mulch, for example, is toxic, yet the smell is tempting to animals, and compost may contain food items that pets can choke on or that is toxic to them. Care must be taken to also protect pets in yards with fire pits or outdoor fireplaces, pools, and ponds. Installing a fence also keeps pets safe from traffic or other animals.

How To Keep Pet Food Fresh

Here at Jean Groesbeck and Associates, we all love animals and we would like to share a few tips on how to keep your furry family member’s food fresh!

To start, when purchasing pet food, it is important to look at the expiration date. Like shopping for our own food, we want to select the food that is the freshest to start, purchasing the food that has the furthest expiration date is typically the freshest. This is the same for your pet’s food! Keeping sunlight and moisture away from your pet’s food is the key! Using storage containers will assist with both keeping the food fresh and keeping the occasional unwanted house guests such as rodents and insects out of the food.

If you are storing dry food, it is best to take the food and place it a container with a lid (keeping the food in the bag for best results). The ideal temperature the container should be stored at is room temperature and shouldn’t be out in uncontrollable elements. When storing canned or wet pet food, it is best to store the food (once opened) in a container with a lid to seal in the freshness and stored in the refrigerator, up to 3 days.

By storing your pet’s food in a safe place, away from moisture and sunlight, you will ensure you are feeding your furry family member only the best! Creating your own pet food container could be for a fun project!  You can even customized it so that it blends in with your home decor!

For more pet friendly tips around your home CLICK HERE!

Moving with pets? HERE are some tips to make your pet comfortable when moving to a new home.

Call Jean Groesbeck at 360-941-3734 or emailus at Info@JeanGroesbeck.com if you have any questions on having a pet friendly home!

Keep you pets safe in your home!

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This is the time of year when many people bring home a puppy or kitty.

Here are tips to keep your pets safe in your home:

 

These are just a few tips to keep your home safe for pets.  Making your home safe for pets makes it safer for everyone!

Water hazards – Small pets can drown in full bathtubs or sinks, but can also drown in buckets or wadding pools.

Doors and windows – Dogs and cats can run away if they find an open door or window so screens are a good idea.  Many puppies and kittens are injured each year by having a door close on them, so be careful when closing doors…even the refrigerator door.

 
Toilets – toilet water is not healthy for pets to drink; always remember to close the lid.  Make sure you leave plenty of clean, fresh water for your pets if you must leave them home alone, especially in warm weather.  Toilets can also be a source of drowning for kittens and puppies.

 Washer and Dryer – Your pets can crawl into a washer or dryer without your knowledge; close the doors to these appliances when you’re not using them

Balconies – Balconies or decks without safety railings, or railings spaced too far apart, can lead to a dangerous fall.  Deck stairs are especially dangerous

  Dogs and cats are more likely to be injured in these areas of your home.  Keep your pets away from these places or keep an eye on them.

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