June is National Pet Preparedness Month!

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Help keep your pets safe during disasters and have a plan and the necessarily supplies they need.

  • Make sure your pet has a microchip and the contact information and photo of your pet are up to date.
  • Always have a collar and ID tag on your pet, and travel with a leash.
  • List additional phone numbers and email addresses to ensure someone is able to be contacted in the event your pet is lost.
  • Keep a list of important contacts for your pet, such as veterinarians and pet sitters.
  • Upload important medical documents for your pet and keep extra copies for yourself.
  • Keep vaccinations up to date.
  • Always make sure your pet has enough food and water. Storing canned pet food may be a good option as a standby.
  • If evacuation is necessary, never leave your pet behind! Pets most likely cannot survive on their own and if by some remote chance they do, you may not be able to find them when you return.
  • If you are going to a public shelter, it is important to understand that animals may not be allowed inside. Plan in advance for shelter alternatives that will work for both you and your pets; consider loved ones or friends outside of your immediate area who would be willing to host you and your pets in an emergency.
  • Make a back-up emergency plan in case you can’t care for your animals yourself. Develop a buddy system with neighbors, friends and relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to make it on your own for at least three days, maybe longer.

For more information about pet emergency planning, visit www.ready.gov/animals.

Selling a Home with Pets

selling a home with pets

We love our pets and can’t imagine a world without them, but not everyone shares our sentiments. This can make things tricky when it comes to selling a home that has housed our furry friends. The main reason for the nervousness is because your pets are not their pets; potential home buyers only witness what the pet may or may not have done to the home, and no one wants to take on the task of removing pet smells and fur from their newly purchased home.

Fortunately, there is one way to ease the minds of those who view your home: remove pet evidence.

Yes, this includes your pet. When showings are scheduled, before anything else, make arrangements for your pet to be elsewhere while a potential buyer views your home. Home showings rarely take very long, so it shouldn’t be too difficult to send Fluffy on a walk with your spouse or children. If weather doesn’t permit this, perhaps ask a neighbor if they would be willing to dog or cat sit for an hour or so- even if it means keeping your furry loved one in a kennel in their yard for a while. You can also be held liable if Fluffy decides to get defensive and either bites or scratches someone entering your home.

Remove negatives associated with pets. If you have a cat litter box or doggy potty pad, clean it and remove it from sight completely. Clean and sanitize the area in which it is generally housed, as pet urine really is a huge turn off in every way.
Same goes for feeding areas; remove water and food bowls, as well as any signs of saliva around the bowls.

Floor stains. Get rid of them. Cover them with an area rug, rent a rug cleaner, or replace it altogether. You can even hire a professional who is well- experienced in removing stubborn pet stains. It will keep buyers from forming unfavorable opinions about the rest of the home and will absolutely pay out in the end.

Repair other damage. Unfortunately, bigger pets can cause other damage such as holes in the wall or scratches on the furniture. This is the time to repair those drywall issues and put away that wooden end table with the obvious teeth or claw marks.

Clean your yard. This isn’t just limited to picking up pet waste. Make sure any damage to the fence or sod is repaired and not noticeable to the buyer.

Last but not least; remove pet clutter. You may be in love with the cute basket you picked out to house Fluffy’s toys, however this is just one more sign to potential buyers that pets live there. Put them in a box or in your car so they are out of sight and out of mind.

The most important thing to remember is to not take any pet advice personal; your goal is to sell your home, not to make buyers fall in love with your pets!

Moving or travelling with pets? We can help with that too! Just check our out post on Moving With Pets to put your mind at ease.

Moving with Pets

moving with pets

 

We love our pets, but unfortunately relocating causes many furry friends to be separated from their families each year. Fortunately, there are simple steps we can take to ensure all members of our family can move with us!

• As soon as you determine when you will be moving, be sure your pets are fitted with collars and ID tags with your name and current cell phone number. You can also have your pet micro-chipped.
• Are you renting or buying in your new area? If you are renting, be sure to double check possible pet restrictions on any apartments or rental homes at which you are looking.

• Does your move require you to put your pet on a plane? If so, be sure to look into airline pet requirements. Copies of health certificates may be necessary, and you may be required to check in extra early for your flight. Also double check the requirements for the pet carrier to make sure yours meets the airline’s specifications.

• Have you traveled with your pets previously? Do you know if they are sensitive to motion sickness? If so, having them on a road for a long period of time or putting them on a plane may make them anxious and ill. Mild pet sedatives are available for travelling animals that will not knock them out, but will calm them down and make the trip easier on everyone.

• If your pet is on medication or has any sort of medical history, be sure to contact their vet a few months prior to the move. Tell them you will need your pet’s medical history records and see if they are familiar with the area to which you are moving. If they are, they may be able to refer you to a veterinarian close to your new home.

• If your pets are due for shots, get them caught up before you leave! It may take a while to find a vet in your new area so it will be best to make sure your pets are 100% healthy before you move them.

• Check on pet registration requirements in your new county or city limits and make sure you have available all paperwork that may be needed to get them registered.

• Last but not least, make sure your pets are comfortable for the journey! They will be just as anxious as you, and doing your best to help them feel comfortable will help their transition to go even smoother.

New to the Skagit County or Anacortes area? Check out out post Are You Smarter Than Your Dog? for great animal training information, and help your pet make new friends!

Moving with Pets?

What will my new home be like?

Once you purchase your new home you will most likely be busy packing, changing utilities, maybe holding a garage sale…. and this often means less time with your pet.  Whether you are  buying a new home or selling your home, moving can add stress to your life and believe it or not, your pets will pick up on your stress level.

Here are some tips to make moving less stressful for “Fido” or “Garfield”:

1. Keep updated vaccinations/medical records with you in case of emergency.

2. Carry a copy of your veterinarian’s business card or phone number.

3. Check with your vet about things to be aware of at your new location.  In Anacortes we don’t have to worry about heartworm, but if you are moving to an area that has heartworm, you will want to consider starting preventative medication prior to going to your new location.

4. Make sure your pet’s collar has updated I.D. information.

5. Have a leash and harness easily accessible.  Keep your pet confined to just part of the house until they are used to your new location.

6. Consider giving your pet bottled water at the new location so that his/her system is not shocked.

7. Have an adequate supply of pet food in a watertight container.  Do not make any changes in your pet’s diet during this time!

8. If driving to to your new location, don’t leave your pet in the car during sunny weather.

9. Look for pet friendly hotels and call ahead to make reservations.

10. If you are traveling with a cat, bring a litter box and supply of litter.

11.  Have your pet’s bed and favorite toys available.

Remember, if you are anxious or stressed it goes down the leash to your pet. Try researching for local pet services as soon as you are settled in your new home. Most importantly,take time to play with your pet and it will relieve stress for both of you!

If you would like more tips on moving with pets or selling your home with pets, please contact us at (360) 941-3734 or send us an email Jean@JeanGroesbeck.com

809 7th St Anacortes, WA - (360) 941-3734

Are You Smarter Than Your Dog?

Are you smarter than your dog?

If not, I know someone who is—at least more often than I am.  That’s why I love my Anacortes friend and dog trainer, Debbie Exley so much!  She works very hard at being smarter than our dogs, and when “smarts” don’t quite work, usually Debbie’s enthusiasm, energy, creativity,  and obvious affection for her “students” seem to win them over.

If you live in Anacortes or the Skagit Valley and need a wonderful dog trainer, you can contact Debbie at 360-421-5968.  Debbie is a Certified Dog Trainer and AKC Canine Good Citizen Evaluator.  She stresses Positive-Based Dog Training for puppies and adult dogs.

Class curriculums cover the core obedience skills:  Sit, Down, Stay, Come!, Loose-Leash Walk, and Leave It” in addition to “Good Manners” behaviors.  Private sessions are available for problem issues, such as the one we have been experiencing with our young goldendoodle not wanting to jump into the back of our vehicle.  At this moment in time, the combined intelligence of Debbie, my husband, and me IS greater than our dog’s!  Debbie always had “one more idea”, and we thank her!

If you would like to know about “Smarter than Your Dog” or help with a dog-friendly move to Anacortes, please call me.

Linda Harris, Broker
Coldwell Banker Bain-Anacortes
360-202-8888

PHOTOS WITH SANTA!

The Islands Chapter of the Red Cross and
The Charlie Randall Fund (Santa Paws) present
Photos with Santa

Thursday, Dec 2nd, 6 pm – 8 pm
&
Saturday, Dec 4th, 12 noon – 4 pm

SW Corner of 12th and Commercial
 

We will gladly accept donations for the Red Cross/Charlie Randall PET project to support the PET Disaster Shelter or food
for the food bank would be greatly appreciated.
Pets Welcomed!

 

SAVING PEOPLE BY SAVING PETS

(Anacortes, WA, Nov 1, 2010) –  The Islands Red Cross and Coldwell Banker Island Living announced a joint venture to save pets when disaster strikes.

When Katrina hit the gulf coast in 2005 evacuation shelters did not have a plan in place to take care of family pets.  Rescuers had to tell people in order to go to a shelter, they needed to leave their pets behind to fend for themselves. As a result hundreds of people opted to stay with their pets.  Approximately 1835 people died during Katrina, it is estimated that one third of those, over 600 people, chose to stay behind with their pets rather than go to a shelter without them.  It is believed that those people would have survived had there been a shelter plan in place to accept pets. 

The residents of Fidalgo Island, Whidbey Island and the San Juan Islands will not be faced with that decision if there is a disaster. In October 2006, the federal PETS Act was signed into law, authorizing the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide for individuals and their household pets and service animals in a major disaster; however no funding was earmarked for the project.

The Islands Chapter of the American Red Cross now has resources to provide shelter for pets if a disaster were to occur, so that people would readily go to a safe Red Cross Shelter.

Brain Geer, Executive Director of the Islands Chapter of the American Red Cross, and Jean Groesbeck owner of Coldwell Banker Island Living and avid animal lover, have been working on what was first termed the “PET” (Pet Emergency Team) project for 2+ years.  The effort culminated this week with the unveiling of the Island Chapter Pet Disaster Shelter Van. 

The van was donated by John and Terri Rains (The Rains Clan). It ran great but needed some work to be Red Cross Ready, so Coldwell Banker Island Living sponsored the needed work which also included having the van painted.  However, the project goes beyond a van.

“The ‘PET’ project will allow us to do a better job of meeting a widespread disaster.” said Brian Geer.  “If it is necessary to evacuate people to shelters, we will not have to turn someone away because they have their pet.  The Red Cross will provide shelter for people and the PET volunteers will shelter domesticated animals. ”

The goal of the project is to ensure that when disaster strikes people don’t have to choose between leaving their pets or staying in harm’s way. Pets will be sheltered in a separate location adjacent to the Red Cross shelter location and the pet shelter will be managed by volunteers. Jean Groesbeck became passionate about this project after seeing a news story on Katrina where a man would not leave his house because the rescuers could not take his dog.  It is believed this man died.

“Half of 3,185 adults surveyed nationwide in 2005 shortly after Katrina said that they would refuse to evacuate ahead of a disaster if they could not bring their pets”, according to a Zogby International Poll Groesbeck stated.  “The percentage is probably much higher in our area, highlighting the need for this project.  There were also over a half a million pets that either died or were never reunited with their families because of Katrina.  It added so much additional heartbreak to the crises”. 

Marie Padovan of the City of Anacortes Police Department will also assist in response planning as well as County Disaster Response personnel.

Chris Terrell and Vicki Armstrong (Sunnyhill Kennels), Amy Terhune, and other volunteers have worked hard raising money and acquiring the needed supplies for the van which include crates, leashes, bowls, and vet supplies.  They have established the Charlie Randall PET fund” in memory of Charlie Randall, an Anacortes resident who was instrumental in establishing the Anacortes dog park and helping with Bark in the Park Festival. “Since our dog park is nearly complete, we were looking for something to do in Charlie’s name to help our local dogs (and other critters). When we learned that Jean & Brian were working on this PET Project, it seemed the perfect place to put our energies in Charlie’s memory,” said Terhune. The funds from their annual Santa Paws photo with Santa will go towards this project. Acquisition of the PET van will enable the project to move forward in a huge way.

Volunteers are needed to help with ongoing fund raising efforts, to assist with response drills and to be “on call” to donate their time in case of a disaster.

The PET Project is a collaborative effort of the Red Cross & The Charlie Randall PET Fund. The goal of the project is is to ensure that when disaster strikes people don’t have to choose between leaving their pet or staying in harm’s way to protect your pet.  If you would like to become involved with the pet shelter project contact Brian Geer at 360-293-2911, Jean Groesbeck at 293-4511 or Amy Terhune 708-9324.  If you have items you would like to donate please call Chris Terrell at 588-8225.  If you would like to donate funds to this project visit www.charlierandallfund.org

Your local American Red Cross and the local projects it supports do not receive funding from the federal government, but are 100% funded by the generous donations you provide.  Red Cross services are free to victims of disaster.  For more information on how you can help the Islands Chapter of the American Red Cross call 360-293-2911 or go to www.theislandsredcross.org.

Moving This Summer? Check Out These Tips

This month, the kids will be out of school and for a lot of families relocating, it is time to pack up and move. Moving brings on an entire new set of stresses and tasks for the family.

Here are some tips for moving, courtesy of Move.com. It might just help save you a bit of time, stress and headache for the move ahead.

4 weeks from move date: Get organized and start notifying the right people and companies that you’ll be moving soon and give them a date to forward or terminate service. Start looking for licensed and professional moving companies, moving guides and relevant coupons.

Tip:
If using a professional mover, get quotes from multiple moving companies to get the best deal that is right for you and your needs. Ask plenty of questions like whether or not they give binding quotes and what kind of insurance is included. Be sure to talk with them about the different options available with full-service moves such as packing and unpacking services and providing boxes and packing supplies.

Tip: Important documents such as your child’s school records may need to be accessible during your transition. Make sure to put these items aside and make copies of any records for yourself, in case you forget what box they’re packed in.

3 weeks from move date: Once you’ve selected a mover, begin by taking inventory of your belongings and their worth and decide what will be coming with you to your next home.

Tip: Start cleaning out closets, drawers and storage areas of your home and divide things into categories: “pack,” “recycle” and “give to friend.” You can always have a garage sale or donate old items to charity. This will make packing day a lot easier and you may reduce the total weight you’ll be paying for to move.

Tip: If you’re moving yourself or contracting for a self-service move, pack the items you know you won’t need until 30 days after the move. It will feel great to get started early.

Tip: If possible, take pictures of rooms and areas inside the home or apartment you’ll be moving into so you can start thinking about placement of furniture, artwork and other items. This will help save time, headaches…and money…on moving day.

2 weeks from move date: If you choose not to take advantage of full service mover packing services, or are planning to do it yourself and rent a truck, start packing things into boxes. Figure out the logistics of the move, travel plans and if other specialized plans need to be made.

Tip: If you are using a professional mover find out what items are on their “non-allowables” list and discard those items or find a way to transport them separately.

Tip: Instead of stacking plates, pack them vertically; they will travel safer this way.

Tip: If you are moving long distance, remember travel arrangements for your pets. There are pet-exclusive airlines available such as Pet Airways but regular airlines have travel options for pets as well.

Tip: If you have young children, you may want to make childcare arrangements so you can be 100% focused on moving day and your little ones remain safe and busy with fun activities.

Tip: Schedule “move out” cleaning service, carpet cleaners and heavy appliance disposal if necessary for once you’ll be out of the home you’re vacating. Even if you’re selling your current home, it’s a nice welcome for the buyers to move into a clean and tidy home.

1 week from move date: Set aside valuable items and keep those with you. Clean before moving and leave your house or apartment as clean as it was when you moved in.

Tip: Make sure the details for paying the moving company are taken care of. Some will require money orders or cashier’s checks upon delivery; know their policy in advance to avoid stress on moving day.

Tip: Start eating all the frozen foods you have, or give them to a neighbor or friend. This way you won’t have to throw them away on moving day, or worry about packing an ice chest.

Tip: Also think about necessities for managing moving day like confining your pets and anticipating the amount of time you will need.

Tip: Place necessities such as toiletries, toilet paper, rags, “must-have” cooking supplies and organize them in boxes marked “open first” so it’s easy to find the initial items you’ll want handy on those first few days of being in your next home. Don’t forget the flashlight!

Tip: If possible, take one last tour of the new location and identify water and gas shut off locations, as well as the electrical breaker box just in case something happens in the first few days so you’re prepared. Might be smart to drop off a fresh box of light bulbs too!

Moving day and beyond: Take one last walk through and make sure nothing has been forgotten or overlooked. Also, make sure all doors and windows are locked and switches turned off, then you are on your way to your new house or apartment.

Tip: Go back to the photos you took when you began to pack up. Now you can show the movers or those helping you unpack exactly where everything goes with photos.

Tip: Unpack one room at a time according to basic needs starting with the kitchen and at least one bathroom…and don’t forget to make a bed as early in the day as possible if you’ll be sleeping in your home that evening! Remember, you don’t have to unpack everything in one day, or even in one week.

Tip: After you’ve settled in a bit, introduce yourself to some neighbors, ask for advice on the best places to eat, grocery shop, etc. This way you will feel like part of the community and can get some great local tips. Don’t forget, you can contact Coldwell Banker Island Living for any information you may need to find a new home & for relocation information. You can call any of our professional agents or email us at islandliving@coldwellbanker.com