10 Halloween Safety Tips for Pets

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Halloween can be a festive and fun time for children and families, but may be stressful for pets. Here are 10 ways to keep your pets safe from PetMD:

1. Trick-or-treat candies are not for pets.

All forms of chocolate—especially baking or dark chocolate—can be dangerous, even lethal, for dogs and cats. Symptoms of chocolate poisoning may include vomiting, diarrhea, rapid breathing, increased heart rate, and seizures. Halloween candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also be poisonous to dogs. Even small amounts of xylitol can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar and subsequent loss of coordination and seizures.

2. Don’t leave pets out in the yard on Halloween.

Vicious pranksters have been known to tease, injure, steal, and even kill pets on Halloween night. Inexcusable? Yes! But preventable nonetheless. Black cats are especially at risk from pranks or other cruelty-related incidents. In fact, many shelters do not adopt out black cats during the month of October as a safety precaution. Make sure your black cats are safely housed indoors around Halloween.

3. Keep pets confined and away from the door.

Indoors is certainly better than outdoors on Halloween, but your door will be constantly opening and closing, and strangers will be on your doorstep dressed in unusual costumes. This, of course, can be scary for our furry friends, which can result in escape attempts or unexpected aggression. Putting your dog or cat in a secure crate or room away from the front door will reduce stress and prevent them from darting outside into the night…a night when no one wants to be searching for a lost loved one.

4. Keep glow sticks away from pets.

While glow sticks can help keep people safe on Halloween night, they can add some unwanted drama to the holiday if a pet chews one open. Pets who get into a glow stick may drool, paw at their mouth, become agitated, and sometimes even vomit.

5. Keep Halloween plants such as pumpkins and corn out of reach.

While small amounts of corn and pumpkin can be fed safely to many pets, ingesting uncooked, potentially moldy Halloween pumpkins or corn displays can cause big problems. Gastrointestinal upset is a possibility whenever pets eat something they aren’t used to, and intestinal blockage can occur if large pieces are swallowed.

6. Don’t keep lit pumpkins around pets.

If you are using candles to light your jack-o-lanterns or other Halloween decorations, make sure to place them well out of reach of your pets. Should they get too close, they run the risk of burning themselves or causing a fire.

7. Keep electric and battery-powered Halloween decorations out of reach.

Electric and battery-powered Halloween decorations are certainly safer than open candles, but they still can present a risk to pets. Pets who chew on electrical cords can receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock or burn. Batteries may cause chemical burns when chewed open or gastrointestinal blockage if swallowed. Shards of glass or plastic can cause lacerations anywhere on the body or, if swallowed, within the gastrointestinal tract.

8. Don’t dress your pet in a costume unless you know they’ll love it.

If you do decide that your pet needs a costume, make sure it isn’t dangerous or simply annoying to your pet. Costumes should not restrict movement, hearing, eyesight, or the ability to breathe. Coates warns that pets who are wearing a costume should always be supervised by a responsible adult so that if something goes wrong, it can be addressed right away.

 9. Try on pet costumes before the big night.

Don’t wait until Halloween night to put your pet in a costume for the first time. Get your pet costumes early, and put them on for short periods of time (and piece by piece, if possible). If at any time, your pet seems distressed or develops skin problems from contact with a costume, consider letting him go without a costume, although a festive bandana may be a good compromise.

10. IDs, please!

If your dog or cat should escape and become lost, having the proper identification will increase the chances that he or she will be returned. Collars and tags are ideal if a Good Samaritan is able to collect your wayward pet, but microchips offer permanent identification should the collar or tag fall off. Just make sure the information is up-to-date. Use Halloween as a yearly reminder to double check your address and phone number on tags and with the company who supports pet microchips.

As a pet-friendly office, Jean Groesbeck & Assoc. LLC, licensed under Coldwell Banker Bain, wants your pets to remain safe this Halloween!  Located in Old Town Anacortes at 809 7th St., stop by our office or contact us for all of your real estate needs at (360) 941-3734 or Jean@JeanGroesbeck.com.  We proudly serve Anacortes, Skagit, Island and San Juan counties.

City of Anacortes Dog Licenses Move Online

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The City of Anacortes will begin issuing 2018 dog licenses in mid-November so be on the lookout for your more convenient options in the coming weeks.

2018 changes include:

  • Renewal licenses will be mailed directly to owners of all currently licensed pets.
  • New and renewal licenses will be available by mail, in person at City Hall or the Anacortes Police Department, and online.
  • Owners will be able to update their own contact information and pet information throughout the year.

 

Proof of rabies vaccinations are required each time your renew your dog’s license, and if you have moved since your dog was last licensed, please call (360) 299-1968 to ensure that your renewal reminder reaches you well in advance of the January 1 deadline.

Click here for pricing and additional licensing information.

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Fall Safety Tips for Your Pets

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Keep your pets safe all year long! Here are some things to consider now that Fall is underway throughout Skagit County and Anacortes:

  1. Beware of anti-freeze! Ingesting antifreeze is lethal. Make sure to check your car for leaks and make sure all bottles are stored far away from your pets as its sweet taste may be tempting to an animal.

 

  1. Don’t leave your pets outside for prolonged periods of time. It doesn’t have to be Winter for it to get cold–especially for puppies, senior pets and smaller animals.

 

  1. Beware of ticks. It’s still tick season and playing in the cool autumn leaves is one of the many ways your pet could get them. Consider using a natural tick repellent to help protect your pet.

 

  1. Let them have their fur coat. If you have a dog that you shave during the summer, let him start growing his coat back in the fall. Just like you need your Fall/Winter coat, he’ll needs his too.

 

  1. Check your pet ID tags and microchip. Take the time to make sure all your pet’s information is up to date and in proper order.

 

  1. Make holiday arrangements with your dog walker, pet sitter or doggy day care early. As the holidays approach, most of us will get busier and possibly have to travel. Take time out and plan ahead so you can make the holidays easier on your pets.

 

  1. Visitors for celebrations. Fall holidays and events such as Thanksgiving and Halloween often mean people coming over to visit your home. If you have a pet that has special needs or is wary of new people, be sure to tell your guests about your pet before they come over.

 

  1. Make sure your pets can’t escape through the main entrance of your home. This is especially important if you plan on having several guests in and out of the house this holiday season. It may be worth investing in a baby gate or creating some kind of barrier between the door and your pet, especially if you have pet that’s known for bolting.

 

  1. Be careful with holiday treats. Aside from known hazards such as chocolate, items such as cooked bones, raw bread dough and many fruits and vegetables can also be life threatening to pets.

 

  1. Be careful with decorations. Many shiny new decorations look like really fun toys to your pets. Make sure decorations are out of reach because many of them contain toxic metals and can become choking hazards.

For additional information or for all of your real estate needs, contact Jean Groesbeck & Assoc. LLC in Old Town Anacortes.  Team Groesbeck is available daily at (360) 941-3734 or via email at Jean@JeanGroesbeck.com.

 

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July 4th Safety for Pets

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Prepare to keep your pets safe in advance! Fireworks are both frightening and dangerous to animals, often causing them to run away in fear. Here are some tips to keep them safe:

  • Make sure your pets – cats and dogs alike – have identification tags with up-to-date information.
  • If your pets aren’t already microchipped, talk with your veterinarian about microchipping. This simple procedure can greatly improve your chances of getting your pets back if they become lost.
  • If your pets are microchipped, make sure your contact information in the microchip registry is up-to-date.
  • Make sure the environment is safe and secure. If your neighbors set off fireworks at an unexpected time, is your yard secure enough to keep your pet contained? Evaluate your options, and choose the safest area for your animal and make improvements if needed to make the area more secure.
  • Leave your pets at home when you go to parties, fireworks displays, parades and other gatherings. Loud fireworks, unfamiliar places and crowds can all be very frightening to pets, and there’s great risk of pets becoming spooked and running away.
  • Consider putting your pets in a safe, escape-proof room or crate during parties and fireworks.
  • Keep your pets inside if you or your neighbors are setting off fireworks.
  • Keep sparklers, glow sticks, fireworks, charcoal and kabob skewers, etc. away from curious pets.
  • Don’t let pets get near your barbecue grill while it is in use or still hot.
  • Never leave your pet in your car when it’s warm outside. Vehicle interiors heat up much faster than the air around them, and even a short time in a locked car can be dangerous to pets.
  • After the celebrations, check your yard for fireworks debris before allowing pets outside to play or relax. Even if you didn’t set off fireworks yourself, debris can make its way into your yard, where curious animals may pick it up to play with or eat.

For additional information, CLICK HERE to visit the American Veterinary Medical Foundation website online.

Friday, June 23: Take Your Dog to Work Day

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This Friday, June 23, is the 19th annual Take Your Dog to Work Day! As a pet-friendly office, every day at Anacortes-based Jean Groesbeck & Assoc. LLC is Take Your Dog to Work Day!

Take Your Dog to Work Day was created by Pet Sitters International to celebrate the great companions that dogs are and promote their adoptions.  Click here for more information: https://www.petsit.com/takeyourdog

For all of your real estate needs throughout Anacortes, Skagit County, Island County and beyond, contact Team Groesbeck daily at (360) 941-3734, (360) 899-5027, Jean@JeanGroesbeck.com or visit us at 809 7th St. in Old Town Anacortes.

June is National Pet Preparedness Month!

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Help keep your pets safe during disasters and have a plan and the necessarily supplies they need.

  • Make sure your pet has a microchip and the contact information and photo of your pet are up to date.
  • Always have a collar and ID tag on your pet, and travel with a leash.
  • List additional phone numbers and email addresses to ensure someone is able to be contacted in the event your pet is lost.
  • Keep a list of important contacts for your pet, such as veterinarians and pet sitters.
  • Upload important medical documents for your pet and keep extra copies for yourself.
  • Keep vaccinations up to date.
  • Always make sure your pet has enough food and water. Storing canned pet food may be a good option as a standby.
  • If evacuation is necessary, never leave your pet behind! Pets most likely cannot survive on their own and if by some remote chance they do, you may not be able to find them when you return.
  • If you are going to a public shelter, it is important to understand that animals may not be allowed inside. Plan in advance for shelter alternatives that will work for both you and your pets; consider loved ones or friends outside of your immediate area who would be willing to host you and your pets in an emergency.
  • Make a back-up emergency plan in case you can’t care for your animals yourself. Develop a buddy system with neighbors, friends and relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to make it on your own for at least three days, maybe longer.

For more information about pet emergency planning, visit www.ready.gov/animals.

Tips for Traveling Safely with Pets

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Taking a trip with your pet this summer? Here are some things to consider to make sure everyone is ready!

1 – The most important animal-travel tip is to never leave your pet alone in a parked car. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), when the outside temperature is 85 degrees Fahrenheit, the interior of a parked car can reach 102 degrees in just 10 minutes and 120 degrees within half an hour. And that’s even if you leave the windows cracked an inch or two. ASPCA also warns that the dangers are not limited to the warmer months: “In cold weather, a car can act as a refrigerator, holding in the cold and causing an animal to freeze to death.” Be your pet’s advocate and always remember their safety.

2 – Consult your veterinarian before embarking on a trip, especially if your pet hasn’t traveled before or if you have any health concerns. Before a long trip, take some shorter drives around town with your pet to see how they respond. Take longer and longer ones as you get nearer to your departure date. If your pet gets really anxious, consult your veterinarian to see what they suggest may to help.

3 – If you’re traveling across state lines, bring along your pet’s vaccination record, especially rabies. Some states require this proof at certain interstate crossings and they are required if you travel into Canada!  Check in with your veterinarian to make sure your vaccinations and records are up to date.

4 – Always take breaks! Make sure to check that your pup is welcome everywhere you plan on stopping. Check in with bringfido.com while visiting new areas to find restaurants, parks, and fun activities that are dog friendly.

5 – Book pet-friendly hotels! GoPetFriendly.com is also great site to check for tons of information on traveling with pets.

6 – Always prep a pet-friendly travel kit. Bring food, water, bowls, a leash, plenty of potty bags, grooming supplies, any prescribed medications a pet-friendly first-aid kit, and any travel documents. Don’t forget your dog’s flea, tick and heart worm preventatives. If you need medication or supplies on the road, your veterinarian has an online store to shop from that can ship anywhere in the US!

7 – Put your leash somewhere accessible and put your dog’s leash on before you open the car door. Also make sure your pet wears a collar and tag imprinted with your name, phone number and any relevant contact information. Some states also require that your dog wears a tag with his state dog license information.

8 – If you are camping or doing lots of outdoor activities like hiking, make sure to do nightly tick checks, and it doesn’t hurt to give your pup extra pets and treats while you’re at it!

Keeping Pets Safe in the Home and Yard

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Pets are part of our families so we should be sure they stay safe whether in the home or yard!

Bathrooms and Laundry Rooms – Toilet bowls are filled with water and often tempt pets to drink from them. This can cause a pet to drown, or it may poison them if toilet bowl cleaners are inside. Medications, both prescription and otherwise, are often kept in a bathroom, as are things such as bathroom cleaners, chemical drain openers, and deodorizers. Sharp items such as razors are also kept in bathrooms and can cut and seriously injure a pet that plays with or swallows them.

Laundry Room – Laundry rooms are also a place where chemicals such as bleach and detergent are stored and regularly used. Fabric softener sheets may seem harmless; however, they are filled with chemicals. Open dryers are tempting to pets that may climb inside to sleep, stay warm, or hide. This can be dangerous if the door is accidentally shut and the machine turned on.

Living Rooms – Unstable or top-heavy furniture can fall if jumped on or if bumped hard by a playful animal. Many types of potted house plants are known to be toxic if chewed or swallowed. The cords to drapery and window blinds are a choking hazard if they accidental loop around a pet’s neck, while electrical cords, if chewed on, can shock or electrocute a pet or start a fire.

Kitchens – Kitchens are an overall dangerous place for pets to be. Jumping pets have access to countertops and tables, while all animals can easily get to anything that’s within their reach, such as kitchen trash cans or food on the table. When it comes to threats, food is the most obvious culprit, as certain items, such as chocolate and raisins, are toxic while others represent a choking hazard.

Bedrooms – Although the bedroom may seem like an overall safe place for pets, it is the unexpected, little things that can prove problematic for pets. Electrical cords are dangerous to pets that are chewers, and small items such as earrings and hair pins may also be chewed or swallowed. Discarded shopping bags are a suffocation risk if a pet sticks its head inside and is unable to shake it off. Moth balls in closets or drawers are toxic, as are certain house plants that may be kept in the room.

Garages and Basements – Because these are areas outside of the main house and protected from the elements outdoors, they are places where deadly chemicals and other potentially lethal items are stored.

Toxic items that are commonly stored in garages and even basements include antifreeze, which is sweet-tasting but can cause a cat or a dog’s kidneys to fail if consumed. Motor oil, gas, battery acid, and car wax are just a few other dangerous car-related items. Additionally, pesticides, rat poison, paint, and paint thinners are examples of items kept in either location that can be lethal to a pet.

Yard – Certain items that are used on the lawn, flowers, and plants, such as fertilizers, pesticides, mulch, and compost, may contain chemicals or elements that a pet should not eat, drink, or lick. Cocoa mulch, for example, is toxic, yet the smell is tempting to animals, and compost may contain food items that pets can choke on or that is toxic to them. Care must be taken to also protect pets in yards with fire pits or outdoor fireplaces, pools, and ponds. Installing a fence also keeps pets safe from traffic or other animals.

Animal Services in Anacortes

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Anacortes and its surrounding area has a wide variety of local animal services, including pet sitters, obedience training and veterinarians.  Here is a list of some of the many places nearby for your pets’ needs.

Kennels

 

Pet Sitters

  • Happy at Home Pet Sitting – Anacortes, (360) 421-6153
  • The Pet Pal – Anacortes, (360) 293-1311
  • Colleen’s Cat Care – Anacortes, (360) 293-7688
  • There’s No Place Like Home – Anacortes, (360) 610-9600
  • Pacific North Wonderland – Anacortes, (360) 982-5184

 

Groomers

 

Pet Stores

 

Obedience Training

 

Animal Shelter & Relief Agencies

 

Veterinarians

 

Wildlife

 

For more information about animal services in and around Anacortes and Skagit County or for any of your real estate needs, please contact Jean Groesbeck & Assoc. LLC at (360) 941-3734 or Jean@JeanGroesbeck.com.

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Skagit Humane 2nd Chance Program

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Jean Groesbeck & Assoc. LLC (JGA) is proud to assist with the launch of the Shelter Animal 2nd Chance program in conjunction with the Humane Society of Skagit Valley (HSSV). The Shelter Animal 2nd Chance program helps dogs and cats of the Humane Society of Skagit Valley who are in need of medical attention to be able to provide them with a second chance to become eligible for adoption.

“We are proud to partner with the Humane Society of Skagit Valley and Shelter Animal 2nd Chance to ensure each animal receives the necessary medical treatment to become adoptable,” said Jean Groesbeck, owner of Jean Groesbeck & Assoc. LLC, an Anacortes-based real estate firm licensed under Coldwell Banker Bain. “We are a pet-friendly office and we know the joy a pet brings to our daily lives. We encourage those seeking to adopt a dog or cat to visit the Humane Society of Skagit Valley.”

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“We are grateful for our partnership with Jean Groesbeck & Assoc. LLC and its sponsorship of our special needs pets to assist with their adoption,” said Janine Ceja, Director, Humane Society of Skagit Valley. “Nearly 2,500 animals come through our doors annually. As a nonprofit, we rely on donations to provide our animals with the treatment they need and are so appreciative of those who donate or volunteer their time with us.”

Currently JGA and HSSV are working to raise money for Ruby, an adult female Australian Shepherd dog that was brought into the shelter needing orthopedic surgery, which is currently seeking financial assistance for her operation and rehabilitation. To make a donation in support of the Shelter Animal 2nd Chance fund for Ruby please do so through the go fund me page.

You can also make an in person or mail donation to Skagit Humane : 18841 Kelleher Road Burlington, WA 98233. Please make sure to write in the memo Ruby so that your donation goes directly to her. You can also stop by our office: 809 7th St in Anacortes to drop off your donations.

On behalf of the Skagit Humane Society and Jean Groesbeck & Associates, we would like to thank you for taking the time to read about this important cause.